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Just out of curiosity...

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
...do you have to do some sort of teaching course, if you want to be a lecturer at uni, or a tutor at college? I know that primary and secondary school teachers do, but what about the others? :chin:

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm not sure actually. I think it's quite easy to get jobs speaking at university by simply being one of the best at whatever subject you do, but I'd reckon in terms of planning courses and marking students work, you probably would need some sort of teaching qualification.

    Guidlines from a website about becoming a lecturer in statistics (not that that's what you want to do, I'd just guess it's the same for most careers):
    What qualifications are typically required?

    This varies from university to university, but in general you need to have good - really good - academic qualifications. Universities generally look for people with First Class Honours or at least a good Second Class Honours, either in statistics itself or in a degree such as mathematics in which there was a large amount of statistics. Most universities look for postgraduate qualifications too. For some, an MSc is sufficient, but many near-enough insist that applicants either already have a PhD or are about to get one.

    Even if you are an applicant for your first post, a university will be keen to know about your research interests and the research work you have already carried out. Sometimes universities want to recruit people whose research interests are in areas where the university is already active, but in other cases universities welcome research interests in any area.

    Full website
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Our College tutors are a bit urm undertrained if thats a phrase.

    I am doing childcare at level 3 full time and a lot of our tutors have had 20/30 years experience in a particular area of childcare e.g. midwife and then they will teach us a unit on pregnancy or something like that. A few of them have done degrees and stuff to get to where they are; but alot are based on experience.

    In the other hand; a friend of my dads teaches councilling at a higher education somewhere because he is a very experienced well educated councillor; but has no actual teaching qualification.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Normally to get a job in academia, being able to teach isn't vital. More important is the number of publications you have, the number of research projects you've overseen, a good research agenda, either a PhD or expertise in a relevant field (important in science and industry usually), paper presentations and plenaries at conferences, and then lastly they'll take teaching experience into consideration, such as tutoring, actual lecturing, supervision of undergrads (or Master's postgrads if you're an upper-level PhD student, but that's unlikely).
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    A lot of the "better" universities seem to select staff purely for research regardless of whether they can teach or not. A lot of my university lecturers didn't even want to teach undergraduates anyway, they just had to in order to be able to get on with their research. Some of my lecturers would photocopy pages from popular undergrad textbooks onto slides and simple read them out ffs! When their research was sucessful enough to be bringing in enough money they would be freed from UG teaching responsabilties.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Randomgirl wrote: »
    A lot of the "better" universities seem to select staff purely for research regardless of whether they can teach or not. A lot of my university lecturers didn't even want to teach undergraduates anyway, they just had to in order to be able to get on with their research. Some of my lecturers would photocopy pages from popular undergrad textbooks onto slides and simple read them out ffs! When their research was sucessful enough to be bringing in enough money they would be freed from UG teaching responsabilties.

    ah..that's really bad...actually that's pretty much what my teachers were like in my school days..no wonder i daydreamed so much..
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