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Mum gets kicked off plane because of chatty child...

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  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    at 19mths??
    its not uncommon for kids to not even be walking at 18/19 mths, id like to see you try and instil respect for others peace and quiet at that age.

    I wasn't talking about this specific case, I was talking in general about people with rowdy kids.

    Though if a kid is still a baby you can stick a dummy in its mouth.

    And, as a general rule, I don't think it's ever too early to teach your kids how to behave.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sticking a dummy in a kid's mouth won't shut it up. There's quite a few babies I know of who will spit their dummy out and carry on crying or whatever.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I dont get why so many people are totally intolerant of children.

    Not everyone likes children! A lot of people find them annoying.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Mist wrote: »
    And, as a general rule, I don't think it's ever too early to teach your kids how to behave.

    Bit difficult though trying to tell a 19 monh old to shut up, isn't it?
  • littlemissylittlemissy Posts: 9,972 Supreme Poster
    Sofie wrote: »
    Bit difficult though trying to tell a 19 monh old to shut up, isn't it?


    Not really, no.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sofie wrote: »
    Bit difficult though trying to tell a 19 monh old to shut up, isn't it?

    no

    IMO at 19 month...you can teach a child what "no" or "stop" means

    sure no-one expects to hear "now sarah, please be quiet, there are grown ups and you are annoying them"

    but a stern "stop" "shhhh" or "no" should do the trick
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It doesn't always work though.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Mist wrote: »
    Either that or they've got a mental problem.

    They don't even need to have metal problems. To come with such a blanket term like that and an even more ambigious solution is a little bit misguided. It's not always the parents fault that a children is rowdy and boisterous.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yerascrote wrote: »
    They don't even need to have metal problems. To come with such a blanket term like that and an even more ambigious solution is a little bit misguided. It's not always the parents fault that a children is rowdy and boisterous.

    Indeed
  • littlemissylittlemissy Posts: 9,972 Supreme Poster
    Sofie wrote: »
    It doesn't always work though.

    I'll grant you that, yes. However, if you have said it often enough and enforced the rules in the past then there is no reason why saying 'be quiet' shouldn't have worked. Simple as.

    You can instil behaviour management / discipline from an extremely early age. Children understand more than what you seem to give them credit for.
    It's not always the parents fault that a children is rowdy and boisterous.

    Who's is it then? Yes, you have conditions such as ADHD. However, if I was planning a long distance flight, I sure as hell would not travel with a child who cannot be controlled. Just like, if I had a child who was kicking off, the last thing I would be doing is taking them to a restaurant to eat. It's called common courtesy.
  • Indrid ColdIndrid Cold Posts: 16,688 Skive's The Limit
    Rachie has a point, we're only getting one side of the story here.

    But, if indeed this is all that happened, the flight attendant would have to get thrown out of the plane on the spot (OK, I'm being extreme. Just teach her manners).
    Also, most of you focused on the fact that the kid was talking. The impression I got was that her problem wasn't that he was talking, but what he was saying, in the sense of "This kid will make people think the plane's going to explode". Which is still crazy of course, even more so.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Mist wrote: »
    I wasn't talking about this specific case, I was talking in general about people with rowdy kids.

    Though if a kid is still a baby you can stick a dummy in its mouth.

    And, as a general rule, I don't think it's ever too early to teach your kids how to behave.

    discipline should start in the womb!!!!

    Neither of my kids would/will take a dummy.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    .
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    lipsy wrote: »
    Not everyone likes children! A lot of people find them annoying.

    You dont have to be a lover of children to just be tolerant.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Who's is it then? Yes, you have conditions such as ADHD. However, if I was planning a long distance flight, I sure as hell would not travel with a child who cannot be controlled.

    Environment plays a large factor a lot of the time, i.e. being on a plane is a new place/experience for a child, they will tend to get over excited and at times this can be uncontrollable. Their mood that day can also play a part. The assumption that bad parenting causes rowdiness in children and is something that can be solved by "good" parenting is, in itself, a juvenile assumption.
    Just like, if I had a child who was kicking off, the last thing I would be doing is taking them to a restaurant to eat. It's called common courtesy

    "Common coutesy?" Sometimes it's unavoidable, I think we all know a case where the parents should have taken their kids with them when they wanted a meal.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think thats really mean !
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Ballerina wrote: »
    so children are second class citizens?

    Hmm, can't vote, can't drink, can't get a credit card, can't do anything else without parental permission. Yeah, I'd say they were. How is suggesting adult-only flights treating children as second class citizens? If there's a market for it, then it'd be a good idea. We have adult only restaurants, adult only clubs, adult only holidays. How is adult only flights any different?

    I find children irritating at the best of times, mainly because I work in an office right next to the bit at work with all the kids parties. But I have no problem dealing with it. A crying/moaning toddler can be annoying, but then so can a teenager playing with the ringtones on their phone, or a load group of drunken blokes. And at least the toddler has the excuse of being a kid. It rarely last very long on a flight anyway, before they go to sleep. Though I will admit that it can be annoying if it's obvious that the parent isn't doing anything to try to calm their child down (like they're letting them run up and down a busy train, which I've seen on more than one occasion). But I do wonder what the same people's reaction would be if they were stuck on a flight with someone with tourettes. Should they find alternative transport too, just to be considerate to everyone else? Admittedly, most probably would, but they shouldn't have to.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    How is adult only flights any different?

    It would be a financial disaster for airline companies.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I tolerate children in public places. That's not to say they don't often piss me off but such is life and were I to start kicking up a fuss over everything in the world that pissed me off, I wouldn't get much done. Such is the nature of tolerance.

    That said, I would probably pay for an adults-only plane. And one where smoking was allowed (as the air quality would actually be a lot better - no joke).
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yerascrote wrote: »
    It would be a financial disaster for airline companies.

    I meant morally speaking. Anyway, if it had a chance of working, it'd been done by now.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yerascrote wrote: »
    It would be a financial disaster for airline companies.
    I would happily pay twice the standard going fare if it bought me a ticket in a child-free flight.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I child free flights would be fanatastic, child free restuarants as well and child free shopping centres.

    after all I'd rather not be tutted at when one of mine is slightly boisterous by someone who must have been a saintly child who was never the slightest bit naughty in public...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Aladdin wrote: »
    I would happily pay twice the standard going fare if it bought me a ticket in a child-free flight.

    Hmm, looks like I might be onto something here. Now if I could only get a loan to hire a fleet of planes. :chin:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    "What's wrong with a beautiful little person playing and discovering the world around them?"

    "Why should i have to put up with little arse-holes spitting on my shoes and screaming in my ear?"

    Can everyone say "hyperbole"? It really is becoming more and more rife on these boards. It's the internet equivalent of shouting polarised opinions at each other with fingers in ears; no one learns anything.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Aladdin wrote: »
    I would happily pay twice the standard going fare if it bought me a ticket in a child-free flight.

    Still wouldn't cover the loses. Most adults who jump on a plane are going on a holiday of some sort, most of them have kids with them. It would mean the end of the package holiday and will just leave people going to work or singletons going on holidays looking for love and that's not a huge number compared to the amount of families that go on holidays.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Oh your average Thompson flight to the Costas is full of families on holidays, agreed. But a great many flights to European capitals or longhaul elsewhere are not. There is nothing worse than trying to sleep on a long flight and not being able to due to a screming child.

    I'm not blaming the child by the way, or suggesting they should be banned from all flights. But it would be nice to have some flights that are for adults only. We already have adults-only hotels so I don't see why it shouldn't work.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Aladdin wrote: »
    I would happily pay twice the standard going fare if it bought me a ticket in a child-free flight.

    whats wrong with first class?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    olaola wrote: »
    whats wrong with first class?

    Because sometimes you get kids there too.
  • JsTJsT Posts: 18,268 Skive's The Limit
    olaola wrote: »
    whats wrong with first class?
    Paticularly on stuff like trains.

    Kids running around screaming.
  • SkiveSkive Posts: 15,283 Skive's The Limit
    I don't consider kids being loud and having a good time 'bad behaviour' to be honest, I think it's just kids being kids, let them get on with it.
    Weekender Offender 
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