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Harder to get a job at 27?

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
Hi,

I plan to do an access course this year and then go off to Uni next year to pursure a degree and get a decent degree.

I'm 23 so the next 4 years of my life will be studying. I currently work in a supermarket, so after 5 years I feel I need to do something with my life.

However, i'm worried that it'll be a waste of time because employees will see me as being to old by graduating at 27. I'm really worried. I don't want to waste the next 4 years of my life and waste money if I don't get a decent job/career out of it.

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm sure plenty of people have done it before. Personally if I was hiring I would look more favorably on your for taking a risk and going to uni to better yourself.

    I would go for it if i was you. :thumb:
  • littlemissylittlemissy knit chick Posts: 9,972
    A lot of people go to university as a mature student and graduate in their late 20s. I reckon that it shows that you are willing to change and better yourself so would put you in a decent position. The only thing that would possibly favour those who are the same age but went to uni 5 years before is experience.

    I'd seriously not give this issue much thought.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    you could study part-time alongside work, or study through the OU while working full-time. Loads of options.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    xsazx wrote: »
    age discrimination act 1999 stops them

    Yeah that will stop them :rolleyes:
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    xsazx wrote: »
    well if you can prove it then you can sue them - better than before when businesses could specify they only want "fit young athletes" or "mature responsible individuals" which cuts down the chances

    Proving it is not easy though.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    they'll see it as having more 'life experience' no doubt, so i think you'll be fine. just be convincing in your argument when you have interviews. i guess it depends on what you're doing as well...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Are you doing a useful degree somewhere reasonable that has a use at the end of it, or are you going to uni for the sake of it?

    When you look at uni's and dept, ask about the employment statistics for their graduates, that should enlighten you.

    Go for the access course for definite though.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think being older will stand you in better stead when you graduate rather than hinder you. I don't think it matters that much at all - people will want to employ you based on who you are and how good you are at doing something - not how old you are.

    However i agree you shouldnt' really go and do a degree for the sake of it - what i always doo is look at jobs I want and then see what qualifications i need to get them.

    Working part time whilst your doing your degree is also a really good idea as well!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I don't think at 27 you'll have any issues. I know a few of my friends that are graduating at 33/34 are having issues getting grad jobs, but they'll be fine going for none graduate rolls. I'm graduating at 25 and got a grad job easily. Just go for it, there's no point worrying about something 4 years down the line. What happens happens end of the day.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Calvin wrote: »
    Proving it is not easy though.

    Pretty impossible. Unless they say "your too old".
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Probably depends what subject you're doing..

    Where I work (HR Dept), we employed a 32yo graduate last year.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I wouldnt worry, the vast majority of people I've met who are doing post grad masters courses are between 25 and 29, so you're not in the minority of graduates.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'll be 24 when I graduate and tbh, I would say that it's best to volunteer.

    The fact that you've had a job before works in your favour (rather than 21 year old graduates who have never done anything) because it shows you can hold one down and also is a good reference. I also think your age would work to your advantage because you'd be seen as maturer and having got all the partying outa you.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I personally do not approve of people going to university at the age of 18. I think that, after doing your GCSEs and A-Levels, everyone needs a break from the exam factories that we laughably call "schools". Anyway, you've got sod all to worry about. Thankfully, not everyone entering university now is an 18-year old. We all know that most 18-year olds see university as a three-year booze-fuelled shag-fest. And these students are the same ones who wonder why they're perceived as lazy. I'll inevitably be castrated for telling this truth, of course.

    Some of us are actually going for more sensible reasons, and I'm delighted to see it. I'll be starting university this year at the age of 22. I'd be due to graduate, if all goes well, at the age of 25. That would be no problem whatsoever. Infact, I suspect being slightly older can actually work in your favour. Unlike those who went to university straight away, you've got a bit of life experience behind you, whether it be travelling, or just the "joys" of the working world. Far from your age counting against you, it's actually your best asset.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    stargalaxy wrote: »
    We all know that most 18-year olds see university as a three-year booze-fuelled shag-fest. And these students are the same ones who wonder why they're perceived as lazy. I'll inevitably be castrated for telling this truth, of course.

    No, you'll be castrated for talking utter bollocks.

    Even if most 18 year olds go to uni thinking that it's a 'three-year booze-fuelled shag-fest' then the first year will knock that out of them. If you actually talk to second or final year students, you'll see how much pressure they're under because of the level of work. Students are percieved as lazy because of an unimaginative stereotype perpetuated by people who don't have a fucking clue. Everyone I know who has a degree worked fucking hard for it, so don't dare try and sneer at their achievement.


    Anyway, to the OP, getting your degree will only help your job prospects. It shows a willingness to learn and better yourself.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    No, you'll be castrated for talking utter bollocks.

    Even if most 18 year olds go to uni thinking that it's a 'three-year booze-fuelled shag-fest' then the first year will knock that out of them. If you actually talk to second of final year students you'll see how much pressure they're under because of the level of work. Students are percieved as lazy because of an unimaginative stereotype perpetuated by people who don't have a fucking clue. Everyone I know who has a degree worked fucking hard for it, so don't dare try and sneer at their achievement.

    man, I've been waiting for that :) I would agree.

    SG, if you go to uni with your attitude, you will be perceived as dull, boring, antisocial and will find it very hard to make many freinds.

    Uni is about hardwork AND fun. the majority of people go to uni to attain a degree, not just for the hell of it, which is a "sensible" reason. you'll need to get off your high horse and get over yourself if you intend to enjoy your time at uni when you get there.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Even if most 18 year olds go to uni thinking that it's a 'three-year booze-fuelled shag-fest' then the first year will knock that out of them. If you actually talk to second or final year students, you'll see how much pressure they're under because of the level of work... Everyone I know who has a degree worked fucking hard for it, so don't dare try and sneer at their achievement.

    Please allow me to elaborate. Firstly, what I'm saying is that many 18-year olds go to university thinking "oh, this will be great, three years of drinking and shagging to come!". Of course, it doesn't work out like that. The number of people who drop out of university at the end of the first term merely confirms that fact. Next, let me state that I don't agree with the stereotype that students are lazy and workshy. Most students now have to work to survive, as well as studying for a degree. That, in itself, exposes the "lazy" claim to be, if not outdated, then, nonsense.

    Before I decided to go to university, I spoke to several people who were in their second and third years. (who have since graduated) I got them all together, and asked them what life is like later on at higher education. I was expecting answers such as "great" and "it's really easy". I was wrong. They unanimously came out saying it was incredibly difficult. I came away from that 'meeting' with a better sense of what I, and thousands of others, are getting ourselves into. I certainly don't think that life for students is a picnic. There are also some users here who post in their blogs on the issue, and that does not make for easy reading.

    As for those who ask questions about my attitude, let me say a few things. I agree that my perception of students is not entirely positive. I do also wonder how I would fit in with other students. I've got to admit that having fun is not a strong point for me - I've a lot to learn in that respect. However, contrary to the view of several people on these boards, I'm not some cold-hearted killjoy. If you spent just a couple of minutes talking to me, you would not gain that impression. I'll be going to university with an open mind. Right now, though, my mind is on work, and getting on with that.

    Has that made it clearer?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    tbh i'd say a break between a levels and uni is sensible (as SG said) it gives you a bit of experience and a better perspective on the world outside of education. people get herded to university like sheep from sixth form / college. as for the OP, i'd say as long as you've got some experience behind you you'll be standin in better stead once you've got your degree, despite your age, than many of the other graduates who entered uni straight from school.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    otter wrote: »
    tbh i'd say a break between a levels and uni is sensible (as SG said) it gives you a bit of experience and a better perspective on the world outside of education. people get herded to university like sheep from sixth form / college.
    That's right, and it's something that infuriates me. Colleges want to send as many to university as possible, because it makes them look good, and the Government funding is rigged to ensure those sending most to uni get more money. When I was at college, the college "careers adviser" practically bullied me into trying to apply for university. He even pushed a UCAS application form in front of me at one point. Is this man a careers adviser, or one of those prats trying to sell me life insurance at train stations?

    Thankfully, I told him to shove it. When I did make my university application, I went into college to meet my former English Literature lecturer (he was supplying a reference) and who walked in? None other than the old careers adviser! Being far more confident at that age, I started asking him why he tried to force me to go to university. He openly admitted it was because of targets, and because he may lose his job if not enough went. The system is blatantly fixed, and it stinks.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I don't think 27 will be a problem at all. On my course at uni, there were a lot of older students in their late 20s and 30s, I know that many of those walked straight into good jobs.

    Just make sure you get plenty of work experience, which would be the same advice I would give to a student of any age.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm going to be 24 the year I graduate, anyone on a similar course to me who took a gap year will be 25. That's for an Engineering degree with a sandwich year (which a lot are), assuming no retakes etc. Which isn't much different to your 27.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I'm going to be 24 the year I graduate, anyone on a similar course to me who took a gap year will be 25. That's for an Engineering degree with a sandwich year (which a lot are), assuming no retakes etc. Which isn't much different to your 27.

    :yes: sandwich courses with a year in industry are a good idea for experience.
    someone looking to employ you (depending on what you do) is going to be looking for a capable candidate, with good experience and a good level of education / degree. not how old you are. - well... military careers and the like aside which do have age restrictions, but other than that, promise it won't be an issue.
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