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just been diagnosed with severe dyslexia

Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
i'm slightly in shock...(and sorry if this is in the wrong section)

I've been undergoing testing to see if i have dyspraxia, but had to have the dyslexia testing done first and then be refered on to an educational psychologist. So the results have come back, and i'm severely dyslexic, and quite possibly severely dyspraxic, but have to go on for further testing to comferm that.

Basically, i had most of the testing, and it was looking like i had mild dyslexia, with was to be expected with the dyspraxia, but then they did an IQ test, and because of the score (which i am not revealing), that blew that out of the water, and means that i could be achieving far more than i actually am...which is possibly why i was feeling like an under achiever, when i was getting A's/B's at GCSE and this year not getting all my work graded distinction (a lot of it, but not all, and i know that i can do better)

I'm kind of wondering what this really means for me? is this going to be the life changing event that it feels like it is or is this really just a drop in the pond...? it would be great to hear from some other dyslexia sufferers (but thats not really the word because it's meant to be a learning "difference" not a "difficulty" right?) on how their diagnosis has affected them....

thanks

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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    yeah my friend was diagnosed with dyslexia in the 2nd year of uni, as a result he got some of his marks graded up which was a bonus....i think if you haven't noticed until now and still manage to cope well enough then there's no reason to think it will change your life now...? i can't comment personally but my friend's gone on to have a good job as an IT trainer in the city, so it hasn't held him back at all....
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i've always had problems (not really badly but noticable) all my life, but it's taken this long for someone to actually give me a diagnosis...mad really
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ud get a free pc if u were in this country!
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    VinylVicky wrote: »
    ud get a free pc if u were in this country!

    Seriously?

    Isn't dyslexia the one to do with spelling and stuff and dyspraxia the one to with physical stuff?
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i believe so...unless we are stuck in a time warp, and it's actually 2 years ago and i'm living in spain still...

    anyway, i've got a PC, no bloody internet tho, and college gave me a electronic organiser, which is a bit difficult to use and i'd rather a blackberry but thats not going to happen....i think i'm going to get given some mind mapping software and then some other stuff but this is still quite a big thing...
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    it'll mean you can work out how you can learn the most effectively for yourself. you're just a different learner :)
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Dyspraxia - Partial loss of ability to perform coordinated acts.

    Dyslexia - Impairment of ability to read, spell, and write words, despite the ability to see and recognize letters

    As has already been said, you have been doing so well before this diagnosis that you should continue to do well despite it.

    It will mean however that you will get added help if/where you need it most so I would say that the diagnosis is a good thing but don't let it define you!
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I agree with Splodgey. Although maybe it'll make you feel better to have your feeling awknowledged by a daignosis? I know a vast number of people who have been disgnosed with dyslexia and they're doing just fine. Seeing as you've obviously suffered with it for some time, this diagnosis shouldn't really change much for you, although you may be treated more kindly in exams. Good luck though hun :)
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    aye he was quite taken aback, not sure how the diagnosis came about either but he must have suspected something...i wouldn't mention it to anyone apart from friends and family if it was me because people have a tendency to discriminate/prejudice, not always deliberate just instinct...
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I did get extra time for today's exam, didn't need it though cos it was multiple choice...

    got a really good study skills book aimed at people with dyspraxia looking at going to university...so i'll start looking at it...

    it all a little bit of a head fuck really, with everything thats been going on in the past month, i'm starting to become a new person...i just hope that new person is more likeble and a bit easier to get a long with
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i wouldn't mention it to anyone apart from friends and family if it was me because people have a tendency to discriminate/prejudice, not always deliberate just instinct...

    yeah if you're talking about joe bloggs on the street they do. but people in your life you should probably tell and obviously your college / work will need to know too, etc. it isn't anything to be ashamed of, dyslexia is a really common thing. :)
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    i wouldn't mention it to anyone apart from friends and family if it was me because people have a tendency to discriminate/prejudice, not always deliberate just instinct...

    :yes:
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    Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,323 The Mix Honorary Guru
    The diagnosis (not sure I like that word, it implies there's something wrong) shouldn't make any difference to your day to day life. If doesn't change you as a person or anything like that, and most importantly it doesn't change the fact that you have to get on in the real world and roughly cope with the same things as everyone else even if you find things more difficult. (Less of a problem I suspect for you, more suffered by posh brats parents).

    What it should mean is that you can get more funding for equipment that makes a difference for education (and sometimes work). They'll do some more assessments, or use what they have, to work out what is good for you. Depending on what they think you need you can get all sorts, scanners, printers, internet connections, special software, yellow paper, laptops, internet connection, graphics pads, the list goes on. You won't get all of it by any means just what will make a significant difference to you.

    Use it to get learning support, forget about it for the rest of life, it's worked ok so far..........
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