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Teachers & Self Harm

SystemSystem Posts: 8,653 Staff Team
If I was to tell a teacher that I self harm, do thye have some sort of 'right' to inform anyone? When I mentioned something to my tutor last week, she was rambling on about child protection stuff.:confused: However, all I said to her was that I was having problems; but didn't actually tell her what was wrong.

Comments

  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I think they're bound by some policy to inform someone, be it the head of your year at school or something like that. Think its the policy that covers most professionals that work with children or young epople - if you're a danger to yourself or others or being abused or something, they HAVE to tell someone.

    I think its becuase potentially you're a danger to yourself and so they have to tell someone. My friend self harmed at high school,, told her tutor, and they had to get head of year involved. Even when she did get involved they didn't really doa nything, like tell her parents or anything, they encouraged her to do so and offered support if she wanted them to tell her parents or if she wanted them to be there when she did it.

    She was 16 at the time though, not sure if the 'procedure' varies if you're under 16.

    Hope thats some help.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    There's a policy / rule at schools called full disclosure, basically teachers aren't allowed to keep secrets on behalf of the kids!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Depends on the teacher. Mine didn't and I was 17. Never said anything to my 'rents or my head of year (although she did tell my form tutor, but asked me first) for the remaining year and a half I was there.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sofie wrote: »
    If I was to tell a teacher that I self harm, do thye have some sort of 'right' to inform anyone? When I mentioned something to my tutor last week, she was rambling on about child protection stuff.:confused: However, all I said to her was that I was having problems; but didn't actually tell her what was wrong.

    just don't.

    You probably do yourself more harm then good. If you look out for help look elsewhere...
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    StrubbleS wrote: »

    You probably do yourself more harm then good. I

    Watch how you phrase things there considering the topic :p

    As to your question S175 Education Act 2002 states that:

    Schools have a legal duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. Therefore, if a member of staff has concerns about the welfare of a child, they should attempt to promote the welfare of that child by reporting their concerns to the school's Designated Child Protection Officer. The Designated Child Protection officer should then ensure that they follow the school's Child Protection Policy which would usually involve a referral to the Local Social Services Department.

    There may be a policy there may not. Maybe ask your teacher out of interest and see what she says as to whether she has to tell anyone or not.

    Hope this helps.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    It depends on your age..I think that if your over 16 then they don't have to tell anyone. All teachers are different tho, and so is how they understand things that you say to them.
    I told my teacher when i was under 16, but they didn't pass it on untill things got worse, she agreed to see how things went. Even when she did pass things on, she didn't go straight to my parents.
    I would ask your teacher on what grounds she would have to say something to anyone, as you are not committing your self to anything then.
    I know that some people think that it might not be a good idea, but i just think that it all depends on how well you trust and get on with this teacher.

    Good Luck!
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    When you mentioned talking to your tutor before you said you had only told her that you were having personal problems but not what they actually were- when she refered to child protection she probably meant if you were being abused by someone else for example. If that was the case and you disclosed this to her she has a professional duty to tell someone.

    In terms of self harm, unless you are in real danger of really hurting yourself then I don't think she has to tell anyone else but I'm not entirely sure. Maybe she would consult the LEA Educational Psychologist but I'm not sure how the English system works, epecially since its not high school that you attend. Maybe she can get you some help to try and sort out what is behind you self harm and feelings of not being able to cope. It might help to tell someone, not just as an explanation for why you don't want to do your placement any more but just as a relief to share a problem perhaps?

    Mxx
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    squeal wrote: »
    Watch how you phrase things there considering the topic :p

    If you tell it too much around, things are just prone to go haywire, especially at school. People start to whisper, stereotypes, rumours, etc. It just WON'T remain a secret.

    I just wouldn't suggest to mix this personal problem with school.
    if help, then professional from someone who has experience with it.
    I just don't think it's a good solution.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Mine didn't. They encouraged me to tell my mum (which always ended disastrously), but never told anyone. My tutor atm and my English teacher have been especially good :yes:. As far as my mum knows, I haven't self harmed in like, over a year :D.

    It will depend on the teacher and the school though.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You'll get a better answer if you give us some more info, like how old you are and whether it's school, 6th form or college.

    Teachers aren't bound by the same confidentiality rules as medical professionals or counsellors. It's hard too generalise but if they are worried at all they will usually pass the info on to the person responsible for student welfare or the head of year who can then decide what if anything to do as your tutor may well feel that they don't have enough knowledge to take responsibilty for the information.

    I'd take what StrubbleS says with a pinch of salt, if it's affecting your studies then you can't separate your personnal life and school and you need to manage the situation as a whole which may well need your tutors support.

    Does your school have a counsellor? What they do and don't pass on will be a lot more clear cut and they may be a good person to talk to your tutor.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    When one of my friends told our tutor, he told the head of year and they put her on councelling. But that was when she was 13/14. I also got moaned at for not telling them. I don't think they can do anything when you're over 16.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    You'll get a better answer if you give us some more info, like how old you are and whether it's school, 6th form or college.

    Sorry about that. I attend school and I'm 17.
    Does your school have a counsellor? What they do and don't pass on will be a lot more clear cut and they may be a good person to talk to your tutor.

    I have no idea. But I do know that the first aider has some sort of list of local counsellers.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    If you're at school, your tutor will probably pass the information on to the head of year/head of 6th form/welfare co ordinator, even if you're over 16. Part of the reason will be that the system will be the same for everyone across school rather than differentiate on age.

    From a child protection point of view you are a child in the eyes of most schools until you leave.

    That said, you should be able to ask your tutor what she would do and get an honest answer.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    A teacher wouuld most likely pass the information on to someone else in the school (child protection officer) who would advise them as to what to do - but wouuld not necessarily say anything to you. Usually the teacher will offer advice and encourage you to seek help.

    Naturally, you will be their primary concern but they also have to protect themselves as a professional. If you took a more drastic step and something fatal happened to you, they wouldn't be wanting to lose their job over keeping a secret for you.

    Personally, I would discuss it with someone trustworthy and then go back to the child and talk things through with them. If, in a few weeks, months, etc, things didn't seem to be getting better ... or in fact were getting worse ... I would again speak to my superior who may then contact professionals, parents etc.

    I'm not sure that helps.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    ShyBoy wrote: »
    There's a policy / rule at schools called full disclosure, basically teachers aren't allowed to keep secrets on behalf of the kids!

    I'm sure I heard something about this a few years ago. Basically, if someone informs their head of year that they've got problems which are affecting their studies, their head of year has the right to tell their teachers what's wrong?

    This actually happened to someone a few years and I thought it was seriously harsh. Actually, the teacher went one step further and told all the students what was going on.:rolleyes:
    I also got moaned at for not telling them.

    Erm, why? What have your friends problems got to do with you? (as in the teachers weren't the first to find out)

    I did get asked last week whether one of the girls on my course knew what was going on. In one way, I'm glad she doesn't know, as I'd be slightly worried what's going to happen if she did know.
    When you mentioned talking to your tutor before you said you had only told her that you were having personal problems but not what they actually were- when she refered to child protection she probably meant if you were being abused by someone else for example.

    Abuse was actually mentioned. The teacher was trying to guess what was wrong and did actually ask me if my dad was abusing me - only because I said that my parents didn't know and I didn't want them to.
    I just wouldn't suggest to mix this personal problem with school.

    Bit difficult when my problems are afffecting the way I act at my work placement and my coursework isn't it?
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Well, not so much moaned at, but made to feel guitly. ''Oh you should have told us sooner'' ''she could have done something really serious'' etc.
    She had made some feeble suicide attempts, but they were more a cry for help. But at 13/14 when you've got a friend who's self harming and is quite controlling, you don't really know what to do. Well, at any age i don't think you'll know what do to. Her case was quite serious though, she'd been seriously abused as a kid and she was in foster care. I hate it when assumptions are made though, i used to SH, not seriously and i never really told many people, especially after i took my friend to see the school nurse who was and still is a complete cow *tries not to rant about her* But i'm sure if you're sensible and make your intentions clear, they'll be fine.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I wrote a dramatic piece of fiction once, was quite gory. Thing angsty teenager here. One of my teachers found it, and then it went up the chain, and my form tutor had a word with me, and also brought up that in graphics I had said 'One day I'm going to come into school with a gun and shoot everyone'.

    Although the angsty teen thing was unforgivable :p, can't believe they'd recorded an off the wall comment like that. *shrug* They said it was full disclosure, but I think they can use their discretion sometimes, when my dad died my form tutor wanted to tell all the people in our form and I told her not to. Since a fair few people in the form weren't people I was fond of, they'd probably have taken the mick..
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    I have a feeling now every time she sees me, she's going to ask how I am. I am so glad that I've decided not to actually tell her what's wrong. I did get told by someone on another board this probably wasn't a good idea anyway.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Its up to you. For me it helped me ten fold. Depends on your relationship with the teacher etc.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Yeah, if you trust the teacher and you get on well with them then there shouldn't be a problem. I found that male teachers were always more trustworthy and easier to talk to, in my experience anyway.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Its up to you. For me it helped me ten fold. Depends on your relationship with the teacher etc.
    I agree. There are some pupils who I feel that I could help if they came to me with this sort of problem and then there are others who I just wouldn't know what to say to OR may even think that they were making it up.

    Sofie, I think that it's a case of you do want to talk about it, and need to if it's affecting your course and your behaviour BUT you do need to find the right person. It has to be someone that you trust and that you feel comfortable with.
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,876,324 The Mix Honorary Guru
    Sofie wrote: »
    If I was to tell a teacher that I self harm, do thye have some sort of 'right' to inform anyone? When I mentioned something to my tutor last week, she was rambling on about child protection stuff.:confused: However, all I said to her was that I was having problems; but didn't actually tell her what was wrong.

    It depends on how serious it is. By rights they're surpsed to keep it confidential unless your at risk of doing 'serious harm 2 yourself' so really unless your suicidl they sould keep their mouths shut. Make it clear that you'd prefer them to understnad u dont want anyone knowning xx
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