university tuition and debt. whats your opinion?

MegglesMeggles Unicorn.Posts: 726 Incredible Poster
hello guys:naughty:
I know i said I was going to take a back seat on the boards, this is important i feel.

I'm aware a few of you attend university, and some are thinking about university. Today, the university i attend have had skynews in debating the topic of student tuition fees with students and staff. you can watch it: https://www.facebook.com/skynews/vid...2616777752910/
skynews have also posted a few tweets about #studentdebt

As of current, students are paying £9250 a year to attend university. my questions to you are:

What is your opinion on this?
Do you know, where the money you pay, goes?
Does the tuition and high debt put you off going to university?



( I dont think i worded this very well lol @The Mix feel free to change it)

Comments

  • FeatheredDreamsFeatheredDreams Posts: 91 Miniposter
    I don't mind the high price because of the method of payment - it's a small % (can't remember exactly what but its less than 10% iirc) of every pound you make after your make £21k per year from your job - so if you made £21,100 you'd only pay back a % of £100, and you don't pay anything back to it if you make a salary below that mark at all. It gets written off after 30 years reguardless of how much is paid back.

    IMO - this is ideal, uni education is expensive to create, universities need funding, and they get that - mostly from the government, but with tuition fees partly from us. But at the same time it reduces burden on government spending (i believe education is the second highest portion of spending the government does, and additionally any cuts - even small ones - they can make are good with a dangerously sustained and high national debt). And then, the way we pay it back, also doesn't restrict access to universities for anyone.(now if we're talking maintenance loans then this changes, but we're not).

    That said, anyone who doesn't understand the system is still massively intimidated by the idea of debt and somewhat deterred, especially those from poor & working class families (statistically speaking that is). The bar of only paying on money made above £21k/year generally allows people to get by, though with rising house & rent prices and a crisis over young people not being able to afford housing, along with other issues around unsustainable resources depeleting, i think in the long term depending on if anything's done about the house price issue & if anythings done about getting more sustainable resources, it will definitely be damaging in the future assuming the bar of £21k isn't going to change with the economy. Or to sum up - I think right now, it's good - though those on the poorer end will definitely suffer as £21k will stretch incomes far too thin for someone who doesn't have other sources of income (but that doesn't personally affect me right now) - but whether it continues to be a decent method of repaying the debt all depends on what happens in the future.

    Though the government seems to be slowly sliding towards -shivers- more debt & more paid up front, the only reason this debt is viable for people to live with right now is that the method of payment - as explained in my first paragraph - is generous and still places a large burden of the debt on governments. IF the method of payment ever changed my opinion would change rather quickly. (have i ever told anyone how glad i am that i don't live in the US?)

    Overall, the tuition fee doesn't put me off of going to unversity - in the end a uni education brings a massive benefit and isn't a huge burden for me to pay back (though, as the world increasingly needs uni education to get jobs, this is debatable - consider the US as the most extreme example I can think of of a society that puts you in debt for something required to live; massive university debt where a large portion of jobs need a university degree, so degrees no longer make job candidates stand out, so the benefit a degree provides to someone is reduced, essentially for the debt americans get very little benefit is given.) - partly also because my dream job is working in a university, so a degree probably benefits me more than it does, for example, a police officer (a uni degree or something of equal value is now required to get a job in the police).
  • Former MemberFormer Member Posts: 1,769,851 The Mix Honorary Guru

    IMO - this is ideal, uni education is expensive to create, universities need funding, and they get that - mostly from the government, but with tuition fees partly from us. But at the same time it reduces burden on government spending (i believe education is the second highest portion of spending the government does, and additionally any cuts - even small ones - they can make are good with a dangerously sustained and high national debt). And then, the way we pay it back, also doesn't restrict access to universities for anyone.(now if we're talking maintenance loans then this changes, but we're not).

    My thoughts exactly!
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